Exhibition on the History of Tennessee's War Memorial Building Extended

Friday, June 10, 2016
Postcard of Tennessee War Memorial Building
Postcard of Tennessee War Memorial Building
The Tennessee State Museum is pleased to announce that its exhibition, Remembering the World War I Doughboy: The History of Tennessee’s War Memorial, on view at the Military Branch Museum, has been extended until December 31, 2016, due to popular demand.

The exhibit, originally slated to conclude on June 11, highlights the history behind the War Memorial Building which was built in 1925 as a result of Tennessee’s efforts to preserve the memory of those who fought and died in World War I.

“We have been very pleased with the number of visitors who have come downtown to the museum’s Military Branch Museum to see this important historic exhibit, showcasing one of Tennessee’s greatest architectural treasures,” said Lois Riggins-Ezzell, executive director of the Tennessee State Museum.
“With the number of tourists predicted to visit Nashville this summer, fall and during the holidays, this is an excellent opportunity for more visitors to view this very significant, educational exhibit.”

Dr. Lisa M. Budreau, the museum’s senior curator of military history, who researched and organized the exhibit, has led several important tours through the exhibition. “Tennessee’s role in World War I is one of national importance. The War Memorial Building pays homage to the sacrifices that were made during this tragic period of world history. WWI was often referred to as the ‘war to end all wars.’ In 1919, with soldiers returning from overseas, the memory of those who would never return was fresh in the minds of many Americans,” she explained.

The Tennessee General Assembly called for “a lasting monument to honor heroes of the world war.” Initially, Nashville’s Parthenon was considered, but by 1925, a stunning new classical memorial and auditorium stood across from the State Capitol.

The story of the War Memorial Building’s origins is told with particular focus on those Tennesseans who served in France, then returned to ensure that their comrades and their military service would always be remembered.

Remembering the World War I Doughboy: The History of Tennessee’s War Memorial will be on view until December 31, 2016. There is no admission charge to the exhibition or to the Military Branch Museum, which is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Signal Mountain Genealogical Society Meets March 5

Wayne Shearer’s World War II Memoir, Part 9: Finally Getting A Taste Of Flying!

Picnooga Kicks Off 5th Year With 5 Rare Photos Of 1890s Chattanooga


The Signal Mountain Genealogical Society will meet at 1 p.m. on Tuesday , March 5 , at the Walden Town Hall, 1836 Taft Highway. Refreshments will be served followed by a brief business meeting ... (click for more)

(Editor’s Note: Dr. Wayne Shearer, 94, is a retired optometrist and retired colonel from the U.S. Air Force Reserve now living in Hixson. In his early 90s, he decided to sit down and write from ... (click for more)

Five rare views of Chattanooga recently surfaced and were acquired by Picnooga, a local history project. Each image was taken in the early 1890s from a position on Cameron Hill by an amateur ... (click for more)


Memories

Signal Mountain Genealogical Society Meets March 5

The Signal Mountain Genealogical Society will meet at 1 p.m. on Tuesday , March 5 , at the Walden Town Hall, 1836 Taft Highway. Refreshments will be served followed by a brief business meeting and program. The speaker for the day will be Amy Petulla, the owner and founder of the Chattanooga Ghost Tours. She will present an exciting, fun, and chilling program entitled, "Haunted ... (click for more)

Wayne Shearer’s World War II Memoir, Part 9: Finally Getting A Taste Of Flying!

(Editor’s Note: Dr. Wayne Shearer, 94, is a retired optometrist and retired colonel from the U.S. Air Force Reserve now living in Hixson. In his early 90s, he decided to sit down and write from memory and a few records he still possesses his recollections of going through Army Air Corps pilot training at several bases in the United States during World War II. A lifelong writer, ... (click for more)

Breaking News

Cash Canyon Road Closed As Section Of Remote, Narrow Road Washes Away

A section of the remote Cash Canyon Road that goes from Lookout Valley along the Tennessee River toward the Tennessee River Gorge washed out during Saturday's downpours. County Commissioner David Sharpe said County Public Works has a large excavator rented for Monday. He said, "They stated the time to repair would depend on if more damage is done tonight. If damage stays the ... (click for more)

Mudslide Washes Away Subway Restaurant At Foot Of Signal Mountain; Nearby Employee Says: "It's Gone"; Flooding Closes Numerous Roads

A mudslide on Saturday morning washed away the Subway restaurant at the foot of Signal Mountain. "The Subway is gone," an employee of the nearby Shuford's Barbeque, said. She said a large amount of mud and debris washed down from the steep hillside behind the buildings. No one was inside the Subway. It had closed on Friday after a tree fell on it. The location is ... (click for more)

Opinion

Robo Phone Calls Have Reached Epidemic Levels

Research tells us that scam telephone calls increased from 3.7 percent of total calls in 2017 to 29 percent in 2018. It is forecast that the number will strike 50 percent by the end of 2019. We were spammed with over 30 billion robo calls in 2017 costing the consumer roughly $350 million. Moreover, statics indicate in 2017 alone the FTC received approximately 375,000 complaints. ... (click for more)

Rep. Ron Travis: Weekly Wrap

House Republicans Unveil The CARE Plan Groundbreaking legislation to increase access, improve rural health and empower patients This week in Nashville, House Republican leaders unveiled a patient-centered, free market approach to transform healthcare in Tennessee by unveiling the CARE plan. This legislative package includes 11 different initiatives that will all reshape ... (click for more)