Mike Croxall: 3 Easy Ways To Manage Your Winter Energy Bills

Thursday, December 7, 2017 - by Mike Croxall, president, Home Builders Association of Greater Chattanooga

As temperatures begin to drop across Chattanooga and the surrounding area, many homeowners see their energy bills rise. Whether you are turning up the heat or turning on the holiday lights, energy usage tends to increase during these cooler months. Yet, there are many steps you can take — from small adjustments to major modifications — to stay warm and use less energy this winter. Here are a few simple tips to get you started.

Don’t Heat an Empty Home

If household members are at school and work during the day, or you are traveling for the holiday season, adjust your thermostat to limit the amount of wasted heat. While you can do this manually each day, programmable and smart thermostats can automatically keep your house cozy when it counts and save energy when everyone’s away.

The selection of smart thermostats is ever-expanding. Many keep track of how much you would save based on your region, size of home and heating type. In many cases, this investment results in significant savings.     

Some utility companies also offer free programmable or smart thermostats to encourage their customers to use energy wisely. Check with your local utility to see what programs they offer.

Control the Air Flow

By sealing air leaks in a home, an average household can cut 10 percent of its monthly energy bill. Use caulk to seal any cracks or small openings on surfaces such as where window frames meet the house structure. Check your weatherstripping in exterior door frames and replace any that is deteriorated or cracked.

Sealing windows and doors will help, but the worst culprits are cutouts for pipes or wires, gaps around recessed lights, and unfinished spaces behind cupboards and closets. Do-it-yourselfers can buy material that expands to fill the gaps and prevent air from escaping.

Use Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights

There is a wide and growing selection of holiday lighting options on the market today, meaning their energy usage and operating costs also vary. The most efficient lights are the light emitting diode (LED) options, which produce very little heat and last much longer than traditional lights. While the initial price of LED lights is often higher than less efficient lights, they use a lot less energy, meaning long-term energy savings. LED lights also typically last about 20,000 hours, which means you will not need to replace them as often. Plus, connecting your lights to an automatic timer helps you control the amount of energy that is being used, as well.

For more information and tips on how to make your home more efficient this winter, contact HBAGC at 423-624-9992 or info@hbagc.net.  


AGC Of East Tennessee Announces New Leadership, Industry Award Winners

Real Estate Transfers For March 7-13

Crye-Leike’s Chattanooga Region Rookie of the Year Award Recipients Announced


At its Annual Member Meeting, the Associated General Contractors of East Tennessee installed a new slate of board officers and directors to lead the 250-member organization trade association ... (click for more)

NOTICE: The Hamilton County Register’s Office did not publish this data. All information in the Register’s Office is public information as set out in T.C.A. 10-7-503. For questions regarding ... (click for more)

Realtor Chrissy Jones and The Next Gen team, consisting of Affiliate Brokers Sara Poteet and Maria Kissner, received the 2019 Crye-Leike Rookie Agent of the Year and Rookie Team of the Year awards ... (click for more)


Real Estate

AGC Of East Tennessee Announces New Leadership, Industry Award Winners

At its Annual Member Meeting, the Associated General Contractors of East Tennessee installed a new slate of board officers and directors to lead the 250-member organization trade association focused on construction. New officers include Chair Nic Cornelison (vice president with P&C Construction); Vice Chair Jason Medeiros (vice president with Pointe General Contractors); ... (click for more)

Real Estate Transfers For March 7-13

NOTICE: The Hamilton County Register’s Office did not publish this data. All information in the Register’s Office is public information as set out in T.C.A. 10-7-503. For questions regarding this report, please call Chattanoogan.com at 423 266-2325. GI numbers, listed when street addresses are not available, refer to the location of transactions (book number and page number) in ... (click for more)

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Keep The Electoral College

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Thank You, Senator Alexander, For Protecting Our Health

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