Lee University Theatre Announces 2017-18 Productions

Friday, September 15, 2017

The 2017-2018 theatre season at Lee University will soon begin, presenting four plays audiences may have never heard of. 

“This is a season filled with plays that are less known, but will be very interesting for our audiences,” says Associate Professor of Theatre Dr. Christine Williams. “We are hoping that our audiences will trust us and take the opportunity to see a new play, a unique collection of plays, or an older classic produced in a newer style.” 

The season opens this month with the intriguing sci-fi play “Marjorie Prime” by Jordan Harrison. Lee student Caleb Siler will direct the play, which will be performed in the Buzz Oates Black Box Theater, located in Lee’s Communication Arts Building, on Sept. 22-23 and 28-30. 

In “Marjorie Prime,” 85-year-old Marjorie finds herself with a jumble of disparate, fading memories within the age of artificial intelligence. In this richly spare, wondrous new play, Jordan Harrison explores the mysteries of human identity and the limits, if any, of what technology can replace. 

On Nov. 3, the season will explore a humorous path with a presentation of “An Evening of Comedy: A Collection of Short Plays” by David Ives. Dr. Williams will direct this collection of one-act plays taking place in the Buzz Oates Black Box Theater on Nov. 3-4 and 9-11. 

This critically-acclaimed, award-winning evening of comedies combines wit, intellect, satire, and just plain fun. Audiences will witness a hilarious sextet, whether played together or separately. According to The New York Times, “The writing is not only very funny, it has density of thought and precision of poetry.” 

“When Mountains Move” will continue the theatre season in February. This play, written by Lee’s Associate Professor of Creative Writing Stacey Isom Campbell, will be directed by Williams. Lee Theatre commissioned Ms. Campbell to write this original work. This premier performance will take place in the Buzz Oates Black Box Theater on Feb. 16-17 and the 22-24. 

“When Mountains Move” is the epic tale of Lillie Mae Bostic, told through a chorus of coal miners and a bluegrass band. Due to the unusual circumstances of her birth, her father believes God has given her “a Word for her people.” Set in Black Mountain, Kentucky, the story follows the decade-long labor struggle of the coal miners for the basic human rights denied them in the 1930s. In the midst of the struggle, Lillie Mae searches for her “Word” while growing up in the Closplint Church of God surrounded by women who join the fight for freedom. 

The season will conclude in April with “Cyrano,” written by Edmond Rostand, translated and adapted by Michael Hollinger, and adapted by Aaron Posner. Associate Professor of Theatre Dan Buck will direct the play, which will be performed in the Dixon Center Auditorium. Opening night is April 6 and the show will continue on April 7 and 12-14. 

According to the Dramatists Play Service, this American adaption of the 1987 French classic gives the most legendary nose in literature a makeover. Will Roxane fall for Christian’s dashing looks or Cyrano’s daring poetry? Find out in this timeless tale, full of wordplay and swordplay, that has been an inspiration to writers and lovers for centuries. 

Catherine Mantooth, senior lecturer in theatre, will be the production manager for this play season, while Rebecca Bandy will serve as technical director. 

Tickets will be available at the Box Office in the Communication Arts Building Monday-Friday, 3-6 p.m., during the week leading up to each show, and one hour before curtain time at the box office in the location of the play. Tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for children, seniors, and students. 

Lee Theatre recommends viewing “Marjorie Prime” and “When Mountains Move” for ages 12 and up, “An Evening of Comedy; A Collection of Short Plays” for ages 10 and up, and “Cyrano” for ages eight and up. The faculty also request that no infants be present in the audience during the performances. 

For more information, visit www.leeuniversity.edu/theatre or email theatre@leeuniversity.edu. Fans are encouraged to follow Lee University Theatre on Facebook. 


 


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