Dr. Amy Wood Speaks On Lynching Of Ed Johnson At UTC

Monday, September 10, 2018

UTC’s Department of History and the Africana Studies program will welcome 2010 Lillian Smith Book Award recipient and Los Angeles Times Book Award finalist Dr. Amy Wood of Illinois State University to deliver the 5th annual Africana Studies Lecture on Monday, Sept. 17, at 5 p.m. in Derthick Hall 101.

Free and open to the public, Professor Wood’s talk will present a historical perspective on the 1906 lynching of Ed Johnson. Questions may be directed to event organizer Dr. Susan Eckelmann Berghel at Susan-Eckelmann@utc.edu or 425-5621. Attendees in need of accommodations are invited to contact UTC’s Disability Resource Center at 425-4006.

Sponsored by the Project on Slavery, Race, & Reconciliation at the University of the South, the UTC History Department and Africana Studies Program, and the Ed Johnson Project, Dr. Wood’s UTC campus talk is part of a 3-day lecture series. 

All events are free and open to the public and will be livestreamed on the UTC History Department and the Sewanee Project websites.  

The Lynching of Ed Johnson in Chattanooga: A Critical Discussion of the History of Racial Violence in the U.S.
Who was Ed Johnson? (Documentary Screening)
When: Sunday at 4 p.m. (Central Time)
Where: Gailor Auditorium, University of the South

The Lynching of Ed Johnson in Historical Perspective (Lecture)
When: Monday, Sept. 17, at 5 p.m. (Eastern Time)
Location: Derthick Hall, Room 101, UT Chattanooga
Livestream: https://livestream.com/accounts/10999497/events/8366292

The Legacy of Lynching in American Life (Lecture)
When: Tuesday, Sept. 18, at 4:30 p.m. (Central Time)
Where: Convocation Hall, University of the South

About Dr. Wood:

Professor Wood specializes in post-Civil War American cultural history and the history of the U.S. South. She is the author of Lynching and Spectacle: Witnessing Racial Violence in America, 1890-1940 (University of North Carolina Press, 2009). which examines visual representations of lynching and the construction of white supremacy in the Jim Crow era. Lynching and Spectacle won the Lillian Smith Book Award and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award in History. She is also the co-guest editor of issue of Mississippi Quarterly on lynching, representation, and memory (2008), the editor of the volume on violence for the New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture (University of North Carolina Press, 2011). Her edited collection, Crime and Punishment in the Jim Crow South, will be published in 2019 by the University of Illinois Press. She is currently working on a book project on cultural ideas about criminality in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

 


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