Hundreds Of Students To Compete In Tennessee History Day Contest

Tuesday, April 3, 2018
Nearly 300 students from across Tennessee will compete in the annual Tennessee History Day state contest in downtown Nashville on Saturday.
The competition allows students to showcase their creativity and research skills by developing projects with historical themes.
The students with the best-judged projects in the statewide competition will advance to the National History Day finals in College Park, Maryland, June 10 through June 14 with top finishers earning prestigious awards and scholarships.
Middle and high school students created projects based on this year’s theme, “Conflict and Compromise in History.” Students compete in five categories: papers, exhibits, documentaries, websites and performances. Tennessee History Day helps participating students learn the importance of history and critical thinking through the use of primary source documents, in-depth research and analysis.
“Students who make it to the state competition represent the best our state has to offer. I hope these bright young men and women are learning valuable lessons on civility,” said Secretary of State Tre Hargett. “I wish all of this year's participants the best of luck in what I'm sure will be an exciting competition on the state and national levels.”
The Tennessee Historical Society has sponsored the competition since 2009 with grant support from the Secretary of State’s Office and Humanities Tennessee.
“These stellar students have advanced from more than 7,500 sixth through 12th-graders who participated in History Day this year,” said Ann Toplovich, executive director of the Tennessee Historical Society. “Their projects display a solid grounding from research in primary sources, critical thinking skills and presentation of their ideas, and they show how understanding history connects to the responsibilities of citizenship. It will be a tough job for the judges choosing the next round of winners at the state contest.”
Each fall, students and teachers nationwide begin work on the yearlong curriculum, which starts with competitions held in individual schools. The winners there advance to district, state and eventually the national competition. Nationwide, the History Day program includes more than a half million students annually from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, American Samoa and Department of Defense Schools.
For more information about Tennessee History Day, please visit tennesseehistory.org/tennessee-history-day.

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To Chester Martin, Re: St. Elmo article: I so enjoy reading your column in the Chattanoogan. This day's blog is of particular interest in that my family, Mosman, started their Southern heritage in St. Elmo. My great-grandfather, Judson Adoniram Mosman, had been a prisoner of the confederacy at Andersonville, Ga and on his furlough and subsequent trip home to Maine and Massachusetts, ... (click for more)

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Kate Gothard was my mother's closest lifetime friend. They first met through attendance at the St. Elmo Methodist Church, going on through grades 1-6 at the North St. Elmo Grammar School (about 1907), and maintained their "best friends" status all the way through High School - at Central - where they both graduated in 1913. The picture shown here is of Kate in sixth grade at the ... (click for more)

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