Chattanooga National Cemetery Announces Memorial Day Programming

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

As Tennessee Valley residents prepare for a long Memorial Day weekend, the staff of the Chattanooga National Cemetery and the member organizations of the Chattanooga Area Veterans Council remind the public that they have four opportunities to commemorate veterans who died either during service in the armed forces of our nation or returned home as active and engaged citizens, dying later in life.  All four events are designed for individual and/or family participation.

The events are:

1. 8 a.m., Saturday, Chattanooga National Cemetery:  Join volunteers in placing U. S. flags on the graves of the more than 44,000 individuals interred at the Chattanooga National Cemetery, following a brief ceremony.  Then, return on Tuesday, at 8 a.m. to help in the removal and storage of the flags.

2. 11 a.m., Monday, Memorial Day, Chattanooga National Cemetery. The 2018 Memorial Day Commemorative Service has been designed by this year’s lead CAVC organization, the Military Officers Association [MOAA], to honor our fallen while recognizing the 100th Anniversary of The Great War [World War I]. Keynote speaker, Military Historian Louis Varnell, The History Company and Veterans Museum, will focus his comments on the Tennessee and Georgia’s roles in The Great War and the enduring significance of that conflict. A special presentation will honor the members of the Gold Star Mothers and Wives. Congressman Chuck Fleischmann, Mayor Jim Coppinger and Major Andy Berke will join the member organizations in an expression of appreciation for the role of our fallen in the preservation of our Republic. Attendees can expect moving musical performances from the Choo-Choo Chorus.

Because of the increased burials at the Chattanooga National Cemetery, parking on-site will be available for Handicapped Only and all others will park at the Chattanooga National Guard Armory on Holtzclaw Avenue and be transported free by CARTA and VVA # 203.

3. 4 p.m., Monday, Memorial Day, Chattanooga National Cemetery.  Join Dr. Michael Birdwell, Chairman of the Tennessee Great War Commission and DAR Historian Linda Moss Mines, Tennessee Great War Commission member, as they lead visitors on an easy/moderate walk at the cemetery, focusing on Great War history and the individual actions of some veterans buried on-site. Participants should meet at the flagpole on Monument Hill. Wear comfortable walking shoes.

4. 8:45 p.m., Monday, Memorial Day, Chattanooga National Cemetery. Renowned Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park Historian Jim Ogden will lead a torchlight walk highlighting the Civil War and prominent veterans buried at the CNC. Participants will meet at the Armed Forces Pavilion. Wear comfortable walking shoes.

For more information regarding the services, contact the Chattanooga National Cemetery at 423 855-6590 or Linda Moss Mines at localhistorycounts@gmail.com.


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