55th Annual Conservation Achievement Awards Recognizes 2 People From Marion, Hamilton Counties

Monday, August 3, 2020

Tennessee Wildlife Federation, one of the largest and oldest nonprofits dedicated to the conservation of Tennessee’s wildlife and natural resources, recognizes 16 recipients from all corners of the state for its 55th Annual Conservation Achievement Awards.

To ensure the health and safety of this year’s winners, the Federation did not host an in-person award ceremony. 

 

“We are honored to recognize this outstanding pool of recipients this year,” said Kendall McCarter, chief development officer for the Federation. “Their dedication to conserve our wild places and recruit the next generations of conservationists should be an inspiration to Tennesseans who love and enjoy the great outdoors.” 

 

Awards spanned from Conservation by Business and Conservation Educator, to Forest Conservationist and the Z. Cartter Patten Award for many years of service to the cause of conservation in Tennessee.


The honorees of the 55th Annual Conservation Achievement Awards are as follows.

Gedeon D. Petit Memorial Award

Marty Griffith of Crossville, Tn. with work spanning Marion County

Mr. Griffith serves as a wildlife officer for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA). Mr. Griffith is dedicated to recruiting new sportsmen and women and keeping those who enjoy the outdoors safe. When a youth boater was stranded on rough waters, Mr. Griffith and a colleague quickly responded, successfully rescuing the boater. Mr. Griffith takes advantage of every opportunity to engage the public on the agency’s work and conservation initiatives. He is especially passionate about mentoring youth through education and outreach. He also seeks out additional funding and grants to enhance the quality of youth events. In his personal time, he hand builds and installs fishing line receptacles where anglers can dispose of their waste line, which would otherwise pose a deadly hazard to fish and wildlife.

 

Youth Conservationist of the Year

Cash Daniels of Chattanooga

For the first time in the 55 years of the Conservation Achievement Awards, an award was given to the same recipient two years in a row. Only 10 years old, Cash is dedicated to saving Tennessee’s rivers and diverse aquatic species from trash and pollution. Commonly known as “The Conservation Kid,” Cash leads monthly river cleanups and speaks with local businesses, lawmakers and agencies to advocate for clean water policies. He is also a published author of a children's book educating kids on how they can make a difference for waterways. In the past year, Cash has removed more than 5,000 pounds of trash from the Tennessee River. 

 

Z.Cartter Patten Award

Ed Carter of Brentwood, Tn. with work spanning nationwide

Mr. Carter retired in May from his position as executive director of Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA). Throughout his career, he was a positive force in managing and conserving Tennessee’s fish, wildlife and public use of natural resources. He became TWRA’s first chief of the boating division when it was formed in 1990 and built it into a national award winning and recognized program. When he became executive director of the agency in 2009, he guided several critical reorganization efforts, including merging the boating and law enforcement divisions, reorganizing the agency’s regional management system, and realigning the agency’s information and education division into a newly established outreach and communication division. 

 

Beyond his work at TWRA, Mr. Carter was known for his national leadership in the boating program community and the significant role he played within the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (AFWA). His career has been marked by outstanding accomplishments and he has achieved many honors for his effective and valuable service to conserve Tennessee’s wild places. 

 

  • Z. Cartter Patten Award — Ed Carter of Brentwood, Tn.

  • J. Clark Akers, III Champion of Conservation Award — The Austin Memorial Foundation of Cleveland, Ohio.

  • Conservation Legislator of the Year — Senator Ken Yager of Kingston, Tn.

  • Wildlife Conservationist of the Year — The Nature Conservancy of Brentwood, Tn.

  • Land Conservationist of the Year — Bucky Edmondson of Gray, Tn.

  • Water Conservationists of the Year — David Blackwood of Humboldt, Tn.

  • Forest Conservationist of the Year — Joe McGuiness of Unicoi, Tn. 

  • Conservation Organization of the Year — West TN Regional Recycling Hub of Henderson, Tn.

  • Conservation by Business — Patagonia of Nashville, Tn.

  • Conservation Educator of the Year — Robert Brewer of Knoxville, Tn.

  • Conservation Communicator of the Year — Bill Dance of Collierville, Tn.

  • Youth Conservationist of the Year — Cash Daniels of Chattanooga, Tn.

  • On Target Award — Jerry Strom of McKenzie, Tn.

  • Dan & Cherie Hammond Sharing the Harvest Award — Chad and SaDonna Cardwell of Medon, Tn.

  • Gedeon D. Petit Memorial Award — Marty Griffith of Crossville, Tn. 

  • Hunter Education Instructor of the Year — Andrew Tweed of Memphis, Tn. 


New Theme Announced For Home School Curriculum At Charlie Elliott Wildlife Center; Registration Ends Sept. 15

TWRA To Host Online Public Meetings, Opportunity To Submit Questions/Comments Regarding CWD

Trail Behind Tennessee American Water Company Closed Thursday For Tree Maintenance


The Charlie Elliott Wildlife Center in Mansfield, Ga. is offering home school programming this year. The registration deadline to sign up is Sept. 15. This year, the theme is "Wildlife in ... (click for more)

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency will host two Facebook Live events to get feedback and answer questions from the public about chronic wasting disease in Tennessee. Comments or questions ... (click for more)

The Hamilton County Parks and Recreation Department reports the trail behind the Tennessee American Water Company will be closed Thursday for tree maintenance. (click for more)



Outdoors

New Theme Announced For Home School Curriculum At Charlie Elliott Wildlife Center; Registration Ends Sept. 15

The Charlie Elliott Wildlife Center in Mansfield, Ga. is offering home school programming this year. The registration deadline to sign up is Sept. 15. This year, the theme is "Wildlife in Entertainment," with each month focusing on a topic relating to wildlife found in the media, and examining the science behind some of those famous scenes. Additionally, students will read ... (click for more)

TWRA To Host Online Public Meetings, Opportunity To Submit Questions/Comments Regarding CWD

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency will host two Facebook Live events to get feedback and answer questions from the public about chronic wasting disease in Tennessee. Comments or questions will be taken prior to and during the meetings. TWRA welcomes the public to provide any comments or questions in advance of the events to ask.twra@tn.gov, or on Facebook via direct ... (click for more)

Breaking News

TSA Discovers Loaded Firearms At All Major Tennessee Airports In 1 Week

In the span of a week (Sept. 13-20), the Transportation Security Administration discovered eight loaded firearms at security checkpoints in Tennessee, including at least one in every major airport in the state. Nashville International Airport (BNA) 9/14/2020; loaded Sig Sauer .380 caliber 9/17/2020; loaded Sig Sauer .380 caliber 9/17/2020; loaded North American Arms ... (click for more)

Woman Injured When Car Crashes Into The Brainerd Pharmacy Early Monday Morning

A woman was injure early Monday morning when her car crashed into Brainerd Pharmacy. CFD crews worked the accident with an entrapment. The call came in at 5:53 a.m. Squad 13 arrived on the scene and found a vehicle inside the Brainerd Pharmacy. They requested additional companies for manpower and began extrication efforts. The woman was removed from the vehicle after crews ... (click for more)

Opinion

From Exclusion To Inclusion: The Need For A New Chattanooga Way

Executive Summary: A New Chattanooga Way The Chattanooga renaissance that local leaders brag about took almost 40 years to reach fruition. It took risk. It took vision. It took billions of dollars. The physical renaissance is a farce if it fails to lift all Chattanoogans. The evidence in this report suggests the renaissance is incomplete. A New Chattanooga Way would include ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Thank You, Bill Zinkeler

There is one story in the Bible that I try to never forget. It’s the one where the Lord Jesus healed 10 lepers but only one came back with thanks. Man, forget those other nine … I strive to be the one who comes back. After all God has done in my life … I may fail again and again. I may be ‘a back-slider,’ and a disappointment to the Kingdom, but, brother, not thanking God every ... (click for more)