Glass House Collective Expands Board Of Directors

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Glass House Collective announced the addition of four new board members this year to steer and direct their creative, collaborative revitalization work in the East Chattanooga community that surrounds Glass Street. Each new board member has already begun to lend his or her support and input in implementing projects that are artist led and community driven, partnering to improve the quality of life for all neighbors.

 

Catherine Colby received a Ph.D. in Anthropology with a concentration on Applied and Cultural Anthropology from Vanderbilt University in 1998. From 1989-1996, Dr. Colby conducted research projects on economic and community development in the highlands of Mexico and Guatemala funded by the Mellon Foundation and Vanderbilt University. She also worked with USAID/Conservation International in the Guatemalan rainforest, investigating the use of natural resources in the biosphere reserve. From 1997-2007, Dr. Colby taught classes in Anthropology and Latin American studies at UTC. Since 2006, she has worked as an independent consultant with local and international clients, focusing on community development and corporate social responsibility. For Chattanooga-based Utiliflex, a prepaid-electricity software company, she has focused on electricity consumption and resource conservation in Caribbean and Latin American communities. Dr. Colby also serves on the board of directors of the Chattanooga Zoo and the Lillian Colby Charitable Foundation.

 

For years Annette Allen had heard her parents’ stories about growing up in Avondale in East Chattanooga. So when she learned about Glass House Collective and its mission, she knew she wanted to get involved. She brings municipal experience to the GHC Board, having served on the Signal Mountain Town Council and Planning Commission for eight years. She and her husband have lived and worked in Latin America, Amsterdam and London. She is passionate about social justice and land conservation, and enjoys spending time with friends and family, hiking, reading.


An architect with Cogent Studio, Jared Hueter is a graduate of the Fay Jones School of Architecture at the University of Arkansas. He came to Chattanooga from New Orleans where he was actively involved in rebuilding efforts following Hurricane Katrina. He worked as the Program Manager of the CITYbuild Consortium of Schools, a Design Corps Fellow, and Dean of the Priestley Charter School of Architecture and Construction.  Beyond his design work with Cogent Studio, he continues to work on multiple non-profit design projects including Learn by Design, Passageways Chattanooga, and the Los Rosales School in Lima. He currently serves as the Vice President of the Chattanooga component of the American Institute of Architects.    He has served as AIA Gulf States Regional Associate Director, AIA National Associates Committee Director, and Board Member of the Gert Town Revival Initiative. He has been awarded the ACSA Collaborative Practice Award, the Design Corps Design for the Underserved Award, Congress for New Urbanism Charter Award, and  Alpha Rho Chi Medal.

 

Logan Threadgill serves a wide variety of clients in the Chambliss Law firm's Litigation and Risk Management Section. After volunteering for a Martin Luther King Day service project to help beautify the Glass Street area, he knew he wanted to get involved with Glass House Collective. Logan is a graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Law and currently is a business litigator at Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel, P.C.  In addition to his experience in commercial litigation matters and contract disputes, he also brings a strong business background to Glass House.  Since working in Chattanooga, he has been a volunteer attorney at the Company Lab where he has had the opportunity to assist startups and entrepreneurs with entity choice and incorporation, intellectual property and technology rights, and general startup business matters.  Outside of work, he enjoys spending time with friends and family, playing soccer in local adult leagues, and traveling.

In addition to his commercial litigation practice, he is also a member of the firm's Startup Group. He works with startups and entrepreneurs on entity choice and incorporation, intellectual property and technology rights, and general startup business matters.


With current board member, Monty Bruell, taking on leadership as board chair, Executive Director Teal Thibaud said, “our board members are engaged and offer a welcome range of perspectives, backgrounds, and insight into the role the organization plays in gathering partners and resources to the table to renew and celebrate our local community and better understand its connection to the fabric of Chattanooga as a whole.” Glass House Collective offers thanks to the following dedicated members who recently rolled off the board of directors: Sarah Weeks Robbins, Ashley Noojin, and former board chair, Peter Murphy.



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