Holocaust Survivor And Stepsister To Anne Frank Speaks In Chattanooga Oct. 14 And 16

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Eva Schloss, now 89, travels the world on a schedule that would tire most millennials.  She has a mission and a message that compels her to not slow down. In her own words, “I know I can’t change the world, but I can spread the seed. For as long as we will remember, there can be hope.”

Mrs. Schloss’s travels will bring her to Chattanooga for appearances Sunday and Tuesday, both at Memorial Auditorium. Sunday is a ticketed event that is open to the public, while the Tuesday event is a special program for Hamilton County high school students.

Tickets for Voices from Auschwitz are available on Ticketmaster. Proceeds will be used to support the work of the Jewish community in the Chattanooga area.

“Eva Schloss is one of the few remaining Holocaust survivors, and a powerful voice for a time that we need to remember and never repeat,” said Rabbi Shaul Pearlstein of Chabad of Chattanooga. “It is incredible that we are able to host her here in Chattanooga.”

Born Eva Geiringer in Germany in 1929, Mrs. Schloss lived a normal childhood until, forced out by the rise of the Nazis, her family moved to Amsterdam in 1942. Then, after the Germans occupied Holland, the family went into hiding. The family of Anne Frank, a friend of Mrs. Schloss’s, also went into hiding nearby.

Like the Frank family, the Geiringer family was betrayed.  On May 11, 1944--Mrs. Schloss’s 15th birthday--they were arrested and sent to the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp. Mrs. Schloss and her mother survived, but her father and brother did not. Several years after the war ended, Mrs. Schloss’s mother married Otto Frank, who lost his wife and daughter Anne at Auschwitz.

In the mid-eighties, after marrying Zvi Schloss and bringing up their own children, Mrs. Schloss became more engaged in educational efforts related to the Holocaust. In 1988 she published Eva’s Story and began to speak out publicly about her experiences.

“Eva’s story is riveting, but that is not the most important reason to hear her speak," said Rabbi Pearlstein. “The true power of her message lies the triumph of the human spirit and the resulting hope, peace and love that can persevere and overcome even the darkest of evil.”

Voices from Auschwitz is the result of many people from many faith backgrounds coming together to plan and organize the event. Major sponsors include Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee, Volkswagen Group of America, Lipsey Logistics, Lipsey Water and Unum. The Tuesday event for school students was made possible through a special gift from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee.

The public event on Sunday begins at 7 p.m. at the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Auditorium.  For ticket information go to EvaTickets.com.



Chattanooga Kappas, Kappa Foundation Present "The Kountdown" New Year's Eve 2019

Whitfield County Holds Annual Employee Recognition Luncheon

CARTA Announces Christmas Schedule


The Chattanooga Alumni Chapter Of Kappa Alpha Psi will host its annual "The Kountdown 2019" New Year's Eve Party, which benefits Kappa Foundation of Chattanooga. The event is Monday, Dec. 31, ... (click for more)

The signs, you might say, pointed directly to Richard Rogers as Whitfield County’s Employee of the Year for 2018. For the past 23 years, Mr. Rogers has been a member of the Sign and Signal ... (click for more)

On Christmas Eve, CARTA will end all bus services early after the 7:30 p.m. line-up trips from downtown on routes #1 Alton Park, #9 East Lake, #10 East Chattanooga, #16 Northgate and #21 Golden ... (click for more)


Happenings

Chattanooga Kappas, Kappa Foundation Present "The Kountdown" New Year's Eve 2019

The Chattanooga Alumni Chapter Of Kappa Alpha Psi will host its annual "The Kountdown 2019" New Year's Eve Party, which benefits Kappa Foundation of Chattanooga. The event is Monday, Dec. 31, 2018, starting with the dinner at 6:30 p.m., and the after party at 1 a.m., at Chattanooga Marriott Downtown, Two Carter Plaza. The mission of Kappa Foundation is to conduct fundraising ... (click for more)

Whitfield County Holds Annual Employee Recognition Luncheon

The signs, you might say, pointed directly to Richard Rogers as Whitfield County’s Employee of the Year for 2018. For the past 23 years, Mr. Rogers has been a member of the Sign and Signal Maintenance Crew for the Public Works department. He and his co-workers have been responsible for installing and maintaining more than 20,000 signs and seven signal lights during that time. ... (click for more)

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Roy Exum: The Loving Hands

For a great part of my life that I spent with my family at the former Chattanooga News-Free Press, we were in a lockjaw fight with the family who owned the Chattanooga Times. Up until the 1970s the two newspapers existed under the same roof, splitting expenses, but that got sour when the Times had a lot more “expenses” than we were duty-bound to share. So then my grandfather ... (click for more)