Hamilton Flourishing Hosts Free Viewing Of "Miss Virginia" On Jan. 29

Friday, January 17, 2020
Local conservative think-tank Hamilton Flourishing kicks off School Choice Week 2020 (Jan. 26-Feb. 1) inviting the community to a special viewing of the film Miss Virginia on Jan. 29, at 6:30 p.m., at Hawkinsville Missionary Baptist Church on 7463 Pinewood Drive.

The free movie screening is planned to coincide with the history-making celebration of National School Choice Week 2020, which will feature more than 50,000 school choice events across all 50 states, according to the National School Choice Week’s recent press release.

Official Film Excerpt:
Based on a true story, Miss Virginia stars Emmy winner Uzo Aduba as a struggling single mother who is losing her fifteen-year-old son to the rough streets of Washington, DC.
Unwilling to see him drop out and deal drugs, she places him in a private school. But when she can’t afford tuition, she launches a movement to change the system that is destroying him and thousands like him. Attacked and threatened by those who don’t want change—from corrupt politicians to the local drug lord—Virginia must discover depths of strength she never knew she had.

“We hope that this film can help families across Hamilton County acknowledge the positives of expanded educational opportunities so that our children can not only improve, but excel,” said Patrick D. Hampton, vice president of community engagement at Hamilton Flourishing.

Mr. Hampton, a minister, father of four and prominent school choice advocate, says salvation and education will be the greatest issues facing the next generation.

“It’s time for concerned parents and churches to ban together to form better education possibilities for our children,” he said.

The viewing is family-friendly and open to the public. Discussion and Q&A will follow. RSVP is required.
 
According to a recent poll conducted by Hamilton Flourishing, education has been named the most important issue affecting local residents.

In December, the non-profit published “Public School Early Literary Failures: A Denial of Civil Rights”, which takes aim at the current state of childhood literacy – locally and nationally. According to the report, about one-third of local fourth graders can read proficiently or better. Also presented in the report are solutions involving curriculum changes as well as school choice alternatives.

In light of the discussion surrounding school choice, the non-profit organization invites taxpayers to engage and educate families in each of the county’s nine districts through ambassadorship. In February, Hamilton Flourishing will launch an ambassador program designed to attract and empower local leaders who seek K-12 educational alternatives in Hamilton County. Interested persons can contact info@hamiltonflourishing.org.


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