Health Department Urges Residents to Test for Radon in Their Homes

Monday, January 13, 2020

In observance of National Radon Action Month, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Health Department would like area residents to know how they can get a free test kit for their home and what they can do to reduce their exposure.  There is no safe level of radon exposure.

“Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is invisible, odorless, and tasteless,” said Hamilton County Health Officer Dr. Paul Hendricks, “It rises up from the ground and gets into homes. All homes regardless of age, energy-efficiency, or foundation type are at risk. The only way to know if it is in your house is to test that house.”

Radon is responsible for 21,000 lung cancer deaths each year in the United States. It occurs in every county in Tennessee with Hamilton County specifically at a moderate risk.  Those who smoke not only incur damage to the lungs from tobacco, but they are also exposed to the constant background of radon in the atmosphere, placing them at an even higher risk than non-smokers. 

Take these steps to reduce risk: 

Test a home or business with the free kit from the Tennessee Radon Program, operated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. Structures should be retested every 3-5 years. Flooding and saturated ground can produce artificially lower test results. The results can be emailed to the owner.

If the level is determined to be dangerous, contact a qualified contractor who specializes in radon mitigation.  Although Tennessee does not regulate this type of work, it is suggested to use contractors certified or trained by either the National Radon Proficiency Program or the National Radon Safety Board.  In any case, it is advisable to check with the Better Business Bureau, get references, and obtain several bids, said officials. 

New homes can be built with radon-resistant techniques. These systems can be selling points in the future. Talk to a realtor about radon in real estate transactions. 

If you smoke, lessen your risk by quitting.  Call the Quit Line for a free personal cessation coach, 1-800-QUIT-NOW (784-8669).

For more information about radon, testing, and mitigation work, visit:

EPA’s radon website (epa.gov/radon) or EPA partner Kansas State University’s National Radon Program Services

TN Department of Environment & Conservation’s Radon Program

Tennessee Department of Health's Healthy Homes – Radon

Residents are also encouraged to ask their primary healthcare provider about the health effects of radon.                 

 


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