Remembering The Fallen From The Great War

Tennessee’s 225th Birthday Series

Friday, February 19, 2021 - by Linda Moss Mines

When President Woodrow Wilson addressed a joint session of the U. S. Congress on 02 April, 1917, he found himself reversing his previous position that the United States would remain neutral in the raging conflict that was sweeping across Europe. As German aggression on the seas had escalated into attacks on U. S. ships and the Zimmerman telegram’s existence became known, Wilson found himself unable to ignore the pleas of European allies that the U.S. should join in the fight against tyranny and German expansion.

In his most famous speech, Wilson asserted “Neutrality is no longer feasible or desirable where the peace of the world is involved and the freedom of its peoples, and the menace to that peace and freedom lies in the existence of autocratic governments backed by organized force which is controlled wholly by their will, not by the will of their people.” While acknowledging Germany’s threat to peace and freedom, he was not unaware of the potential cost to the American people.
“There are, it may be, many months of fiery trial and sacrifice ahead of us.
It is a fearful thing to lead this great peaceful people into war, into the most terrible and disastrous of all wars, civilization itself seeming to be in the balance. But the right is more precious than peace, and we shall fight for the things which we have always carried nearest our hearts. . .” In a strongly worded echo of the Founding Fathers, the president reminded the members of Congress - - and the American people - - of those principles most dear to the American Dream: “. . .democracy, for the right of those who submit to authority to have a voice in their own governments. . .” 

Congress responded to Wilson’s call to arms by approving a Declaration of War on 06 April, 1917 and the nation began to prepare for war and the creation of an American Expeditionary Force that would join the Allies in the European theater. General John J. “Black Jack” Pershing was chosen to command U. S. forces and the call for “volunteers” rang out across the nation.

One hundred years ago, President Wilson had only days remaining in his second term in office and his perceived failure to secure Congressional approval for the Versailles Treaty and the formation of the League of Nations continued to haunt him, along with the almost 120,000 military deaths.

While Hamilton County does not currently have a comprehensive World War I Memorial, it seems most appropriate to remember the men from this region who died in service to their nation and the fight to “make the world safe for democracy.” 

The roll call of honored dead, first published in a memorial edition of The Chattanooga Times on May 25, 1919 and hopefully soon to be prominently displayed in the proposed Chattanooga War Memorial Park, are listed below. 

Lt. Frank H. Atlee, Chattanooga
Corp. John Acuff, Ooltewah
James C. Adkins, Flat Rock, AL
James F. Barnes, Cleveland
Charlie Blair, Chattanooga
Arthur N. Bacon, Riceville
Albert A. Bowman, Harriman
Paul A. Bunn, Sherwood
Albert C. Burton, Birchwood
John Henry Burchfield, Rockwood
Lake Clifton Boyd, Chattanooga
Gainsarvil Boydston, Sulphur Springs, GA.
Lt. R. F. Buchanan, Chattanooga
Sgt. Fred W. Brady, Dayton
Nathan Brewer, Chattanooga
Lionel LaFayette Camp, Chattanooga
James F. Collins, Birchwood
Roy E. Campbell, Woodville, AL
Vince Riley Choate, South Pittsburg
Otis Cloud, Stevenson
Osborne L. Colville, Chattanooga
Lt. Charles William Loaring Clark, Chattanooga
Jones A. Childress, Paint Rock, AL
James H. Curtis, Pikeville
Roy Conner, Ringgold
Thomas C. Cate, Ocoee
Thomas M. Cain, Alton Park
William W. Carson, Rossville
Winslow Edward Cowan, Whitehall
Clinton F. Dellus, Chattanooga
Robert A. Dykes, Whitwell
Jesse M. Durham, Kensington, GA
Arthur Bryant Douglas, Rockwood
Sgt. Marshall Barron Dudderer, Chattanooga
George Dillard, Chattanooga
Thomas Earl Dempsey, East Lake
Corp. Earl E. Dodson, Clifty
John Donahoo, Chattanooga
Benn W. Elbon, East Lake
Joseph Holloway Evans, Rockwood
Floyd Edge, Chattanooga
WillardJ. Eskew, Rossville
Thomas J. Freeman, Chattanooga
William L. Freeman, Chickamauga
William Dean Faris, Chattanooga
Capt. Leonard I. Frank, Chattanooga
Capt. Fred W. Fritts, Chattanooga
John W. Finney, Rhea Springs
Charlie Fitch, Sweetwater
John G. Foster, Stevenson, AL
Ollie Goins, Chattanooga
Lt. C. B. Grayson, Chattanooga
Capt. Jonathan F. Gafney, Chattanooga
Fred C. Guth, Evansville
James H. Gholston, Chattanooga
Victor H. Greene, Chattanooga
John Garrison, Spring City
Roy Ulric Grider, Stevenson, AL
James Humphrey, Ooltewah
James Elmer Hunter, Kensington, GA
Corp. Henry Houston, Chattanooga
Edward H. Hickey, Rockwood,
Corp. William J. Humphreys, Menlo, GA
John Henley, East Lake
Lida M. Hackworth, Cedar Springs
William E. Hamilton, Chattanooga
David G. Hickey, Niota
John W. Haynes, Chattanooga
David Clifford Hickey, Sweetwater
Lt. J. P. Hunt, Chattanooga
Corp. A. B. Holdam, Chattanooga
Sam M. Hill, Decatur
Edwin Hale, Chattanooga
Carl E. Harrison, Hixson
James Harrison, Whitwell
Ernest H. Johnson, Chattanooga
Corp. E. L. Johnson, Chattanooga
Victor S. Johnson, Dunlap
Grundy B. Johnson, Decatur
Lt. James A. Johnson, Chattanooga
John Warren Jillson, Sunnyside
Sgt. Homer Jenkins, Riceville
Sgt. Roy B. Johnson, Stanford
Abe L. Kennedy, Chattanooga
John Franklin Keys, Cleveland
Lt. H. A. Kroeger, James County
Sam. B. Kennerly, Decherd
Xaviet T. Kuss, Chattanooga
Thomas Cobbs Kyle, Scottsboro, AL
Oscar Kibble, Charleston
Lt. Jacob Long, Chattanooga
Frank Lockard, Larkinsville, AL
Lt. James C. Lodor, Chattanooga
Leonard Lee Liner, Calhoun
Sgt. D. A. Ledford, Etowah
Fred T. Lyle, Sale Creek
Sgt. T. J. Lowry, Gurley, AL
Corp. Fred R. Losey, Ridgedale
Edd Lane, Birchwood
Claude Levi, Soddy
George W. Levi, Soddy
John A. Levi, Soddy
A. B. Littleton, Chattanooga
John A. Lewis, White Co., TN
Bratcher H. Long, Peakland
William Light, Chattanooga
Columbus McNelly, Benton
Francis Arthur Mason, St. Elmo
Gail A. H. McKinley, Kensington, GA
John Herbert Mishler, Chattanooga
Claude Merony, Chattanooga
Corp. Harner Moore, Chattanooga
James McIssac, Chattanooga
Cliffort M. McCary, Summerville, GA
Eastly Maxwell, Whiteside
Buford McCullough, Shepherd
Ben H. McClary, Benton
Lt. William A. Ohis, Chattanooga
Sgt. H. L. Payne, Riceville
Samuel D. Picklesimer, Chattanooga
Corp. E. A. Powers, Guntersville, AL
J. Clyde Price, Chattanooga
Lt. S. M. Prothro, Tunnel Hill, GA
J. L. Paris, Bridgesport, AL
Corp. W. F. Ramsay, East Lake
Carlton H. Randall, Highland Park
Lt. Lonus Reed, Helenwood
James J. Roberson, Ringgold, GA
Edward Earl Reaveley, Sale Creek
George Foster Ridley, Stevenson, AL
Pritchard Reynold, Rockwood
Sgt. Charles C. Robson, Chattanooga
Sgt. Thomas O. Roy, Tasso, Bradley County
H. F. St. John, West Sherwood

Capt. H. A. Seymour, Cleveland
George D. Sheridan, Sherwood
Eugene Sharpe, Chattanooga
Richard Sharp, Rhea Springs
Sgt. Jesse Simms, Athens
Bert J. Smith, Rising Fawn, GA
Curtis Elmer Smith, Rockwood
Corp. Harry E. Smith, Tyner
Corp. John F. Smith, Chattanooga
Nathan Smith, Shepherd
William Wells Smyth, Wildwood, GA
John Springer, Chattanooga
Clifford T. Stegall, Kingston
Richard Sharp, Rhea Springs
Lt. D. K. Summers, Chattanooga
Charles N. Tatum, Cleveland
Charles H. Taliaferro, Ooltewah,
Lt. C. S. Timothy, Chattanooga
Corp. Jesse Tucker, Chattanooga
Corp. Earl W. Vickery, Chattanooga
Dr. M. M. Wagner, Chattanooga
Claud Thomas Walker, Soddy
Clifford Orin Waller, Chattanooga
Reuben R. Wallin, Harriman
George Edward West, Oliver Springs
Corp. Rae West, Calhoun
Thomas R. West, Oliver Springs
Thomas C. Williams, Ringgold, GA
David L. Wilson, Winchester
Ray Wilson, Chattanooga
Joyce Winker, Cleveland
Claud Womac, Athens
John J. Womble, Chattanooga

If readers know of other Hamilton County residents who died in service during the Great War, please email the Linda Moss Mines, Chattanooga and Hamilton County historian, at localhistorycounts@gmail.com.

Curtis Coulter Releases Book On History Of Sale Creek "An Excursion To The Past"

Remembering The Fallen From The Great War

John Shearer: Early Riverside High Graduates Recall Joy, Challenges Of New School


Curtis Coulter's "An Excursion to the Past" is a unique, historical book of two small towns in America with long histories, beginning in 1775 with the sale of 20 million acres of land by the ... (click for more)

When President Woodrow Wilson addressed a joint session of the U. S. Congress on 02 April, 1917, he found himself reversing his previous position that the United States would remain neutral in ... (click for more)

In late August 1963, thousands descended on Washington. D.C., for the famous march and rally to push for a federal civil rights bill, a gathering that culminated with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s ... (click for more)



Memories

Curtis Coulter Releases Book On History Of Sale Creek "An Excursion To The Past"

Curtis Coulter's "An Excursion to the Past" is a unique, historical book of two small towns in America with long histories, beginning in 1775 with the sale of 20 million acres of land by the Cherokee Indian Nation to the Transylvania Company. That event sparked the great Indian Wars of East Tennessee that led up to the April 29, 1779 auction that gave Sale Creek its name. Other ... (click for more)

Remembering The Fallen From The Great War

When President Woodrow Wilson addressed a joint session of the U. S. Congress on 02 April, 1917, he found himself reversing his previous position that the United States would remain neutral in the raging conflict that was sweeping across Europe. As German aggression on the seas had escalated into attacks on U. S. ships and the Zimmerman telegram’s existence became known, Wilson ... (click for more)

Breaking News

Westrock Facility Off Manufacturers Road Damaged By 2-Alarm Fire Sunday Afternoon

Chattanooga firefighters prevented a two-alarm fire from spreading through a massive warehouse on Sunday afternoon. The call came out at 4:30 p.m. on Sunday to the WestRock facility on Compress Street off Manufacturers Road. WestRock makes cardboard boxes. Responding crews could see heavy smoke coming from the structure and knew they were dealing with an active fire. ... (click for more)

Tony Bigoms, Convicted In 2012 Murder Of Dana Wilkes, Dies In State Prison

Tony Bigoms, 61, who was convicted in the 2012 murder of Dana Wilkes, died on Friday in a state prison. Bigoms was tried and convicted twice in the murder and dismemberment of Ms. Wilkes. Her body was found on the banks of the Chickamauga River. He was convicted of first-degree murder in 2014, but was granted a retrial after the court of appeals found issues with the sequestration ... (click for more)

Opinion

COVID Vaccine: Fomenting Fear And Spreading Disinformation

Tennesseans have proven we are resilient and determined moving through the COVID pandemic response. Getting to this point in our state -- one of only a handful that has economic growth, open schools and an ability to see a light at the end of this proverbial tunnel -- has taken unbelievable effort. Yet, one revelation of many over the last year has been the need to reject those ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: My Garden In March

It was about midnight last night, just at the point we flip a page on the calendar, when the month of March arrived in the middle of a thunderstorm. You bet, just as it has for ages, this month arrives like a lion and eases out 31 days from now as a lamb. I could hardly mind the thunder; I am so glad to see the arrival of spring and the promise my flowers will awake from their winter’s ... (click for more)