Chattanooga Zoo Announces New African Species

Thursday, July 30, 2020
The Chattanooga Zoo now has blue duikers
The Chattanooga Zoo now has blue duikers

The Chattanooga Zoo has expanded its animal collection once again and welcomes blue duikers to the Makazi ya Twiga exhibit area. This new species is being housed in one of the indoor
habitat spaces inside the newly constructed giraffe barn.

The Makazi ya Twiga area of the zoo now houses giraffes and blue duikers, with more African species to be added as more phases of this project are complete.

Through the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Species Survival Plan, the Chattanooga Zoo has acquired two blue duikers, one male and one female, as a recommended breeding pair. The SSP is a population management and conservation program created by the AZA to ultimately enhance the preservation of threatened species in the wild by monitoring the placement, breeding, and propagation of these selected species within AZA-accredited institutions.

The male, Branch - age 6, came to the zoo from the Kansas City Zoo in Kansas City, Mo., and the female, Poppy - age 1, came from the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, Md. The pair arrived at the zoo about a month ago and have been acclimating to their new home and caregivers.

“We are excited to continue to grow and diversify our animal collection with this new species," said Dardenelle Long, Chattanooga Zoo CEO and president. “The addition of our adorable blue duikers is indicative of our commitment to provide an engaging experience to help connect our visitors with our animals.”

The blue duiker is a small antelope species that inhabits a variety of forests and woodlands throughout central, eastern, and southern Africa. Blue duikers spend most of their time foraging for fruits and plants to eat on the forest floor. Duikers get their name from the Dutch word for “diver” referring to their tendency to dive into dense underbrush and hide when they feel threatened. According to the IUCN Red List, blue duikers are classified as “least concern” but are threatened in the wild by hunters and natural predators. 

The Zoo’s blue duikers are now in their habitat and are viewable by the public.

As a reminder, the Zoo has new guidelines for visitors in response to the current pandemic. As directed and mandated by the Hamilton County Health Department, all guests ages 12+ are required to wear a face mask when entering the Zoo, in indoor spaces, during zoo experiences and activities, and outdoors when unable to substantially maintain appropriate social distancing from others. Please see Hamilton County’s mandate for more information and for a list of exemptions.

For more information on the Zoo’s current COVID-19 guidelines, please visit the Zoo’s website.


ArtsBuild Now Accepting Community Cultural Connections Applications

On National 811 Day, Chattanooga Gas Reminds Customers To Practice Safe Digging Year-Round

Life With Ferris: Kindness Is Key


ArtsBuild is now accepting applications for its Community Cultural Connections grants. Grants of up to $2,000 are awarded on a rolling basis for projects or programs that "use the arts to make ... (click for more)

Tuesday on National 811 Day, Chattanooga Gas reminds everyone in the community to Do Your Part and practice safe digging. From the do-it-yourself homeowners to professional construction crews, ... (click for more)

Kathleen Crevasse recently shared on her Facebook page, “In a world where you can be anything, be kind.” That’s nice, I thought to myself. Maybe I’ll remember to be kind. A few minutes ... (click for more)



Happenings

ArtsBuild Now Accepting Community Cultural Connections Applications

ArtsBuild is now accepting applications for its Community Cultural Connections grants. Grants of up to $2,000 are awarded on a rolling basis for projects or programs that "use the arts to make our community a better place." Community Cultural Connections grants began in 2012 in response to Chattanooga’s city-wide cultural plan Imagine Chattanooga 20/20. The goal of the program ... (click for more)

On National 811 Day, Chattanooga Gas Reminds Customers To Practice Safe Digging Year-Round

Tuesday on National 811 Day, Chattanooga Gas reminds everyone in the community to Do Your Part and practice safe digging. From the do-it-yourself homeowners to professional construction crews, everyone must do their part to prevent accidents and damages by dialing 811 to have underground lines marked prior to digging, officials said. Nationwide, a utility line is damaged once ... (click for more)

Breaking News

County Commission Told That Local Company With $85 Million Expansion Got "No Help" From City Government

County Commission members were told Wednesday that a local firm's effort to invest $85 million and create 120 new jobs in Chattanooga got absolutely no help from city government. Officials of Southern Champion Tray on Tuesday announced the major project, but the press release did not have any quotes from Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke as usually would be the case. County Mayor ... (click for more)

Commissioner Smedley Says Most Apison Residents Do Not Want New Dollar General

County Commissioner Sabrena Smedley said Wednesday that most Apison residents like their rural way of life and do not want a new Dollar General. She said the location of the requested store at 11156 East Brainerd Road "is right in the middle of a residential area." Ben Berry, an engineer from Cleveland, Tn., said Apison is growing and many residents would welcome a new shopping ... (click for more)

Opinion

PILOTs In The Pandemic Period

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed almost everything. But there are a few exceptions. One exception is how easy it still is for a company to get a Payment-in-Lieu-of-Tax (PILOT) Agreement from Hamilton County. On Wednesday at the Hamilton County Commission agenda meeting, commissioners and the county mayor appeared enthusiastic about approving a property tax break for Southern ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: The Lunchbox Letters

You’ll remember the COVID crisis abruptly ended the 2019-20 school year in April and then followed a miserable four months where the flu effectively prohibited our children from seeing their friends, playing Little League baseball and being on the swim team. Our psychologists tell us the children have also suffered from “negative mental health issues.” Children need to begin catching ... (click for more)