Chattanooga State Receives $1,123,200 Grant For Career And Technical Education Programs

Monday, June 20, 2022
Tennessee Board of Regents Chancellor Flora W. Tydings met with leaders of colleges receiving the Perkins READI grants. From left, Tennessee College of Applied Technology Murfreesboro President Carol Puryear; Chancellor Flora W. Tydings; Volunteer State Community College President Orinthia Montague; Tim Dellinger, vice president for financial and administrative affairs, Jackson State Community College; TCAT Knoxville President Kelli Chaney; TCAT Crossville President Cliff Wightman, and TCAT Dickson President Arrita Summers.
Tennessee Board of Regents Chancellor Flora W. Tydings met with leaders of colleges receiving the Perkins READI grants. From left, Tennessee College of Applied Technology Murfreesboro President Carol Puryear; Chancellor Flora W. Tydings; Volunteer State Community College President Orinthia Montague; Tim Dellinger, vice president for financial and administrative affairs, Jackson State Community College; TCAT Knoxville President Kelli Chaney; TCAT Crossville President Cliff Wightman, and TCAT Dickson President Arrita Summers.

Chattanooga State Community College is one of seven Tennessee community and technical colleges receiving grants totaling just over $5.7 million to boost career and technical education programs, through the federal Perkins Grant program.

The Perkins READI (Recruit Engage And Develop for Innovation) Grants have been awarded to the following institutions following a competitive application process by the Tennessee Board of Regents:

Chattanooga State Community College - $1,123,200 
Tennessee College of Applied Technology (TCAT) Dickson - $1 million
TCAT Knoxville - $1 million
TCAT Murfreesboro - $1 million
Jackson State Community College - $673,000 
Volunteer State Community College - $500,000
TCAT Crossville - $424,659

Perkins funds are awarded by the federal government under provisions of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006, as amended by the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act of 2018. The Tennessee Board of Regents established the READI Grants with unexpended Perkins funding from previous fiscal years that would otherwise expire this year.

Colleges were given an opportunity to apply for READI grants for these purposes: purchasing equipment for training to help get students “READI” for future careers; engaging high school students, in college-credit opportunities such as dual enrollment programs, and in exposing them to innovative CTE programs; high-quality professional development for CTE faculty and staff, and other purposes allowed under the Perkins Act.

Federal Perkins funding is awarded annually for career and technical education programs, with a typical award per institution of between $50,000 and $100,000. The READI Grant created a rare opportunity for a college to receive a one-time award amount worth up to $1 million in funding. Several colleges that applied included a focus on special-population students or students in non-traditional occupational programs.

“That amount of funding could be life-changing for career and technical education students, especially at colleges that creatively decide to focus on special populations in the use of the funds,” said Tennessee Board of Regents Chancellor Flora W. Tydings.

“While there were many good applications, singling out the best was a difficult process. I look forward to seeing how the colleges make a difference in the lives of their students and their communities with this funding,” the chancellor said.

Michael Tinsley, TBR assistant vice chancellor for student success, said the recipient colleges submitted a broad list of equipment, services and programs that they plan to use the funding for, including CTE camps for students; professional development; industry certification exams, and training equipment for such career and technical education programs as automotive and diesel technology, building construction, computer information technology, cosmetology, culinary arts, dental assisting, digital graphic design, heating ventilation and air conditioning, mechatronics, nursing and welding.

 


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