Georgia Trust Announces 2020 Statewide Preservation Awards

Friday, April 17, 2020

The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation announced on Friday, 24 awards recognizing the best of preservation in Georgia.

“This is the Trust’s 43rd annual Preservation Awards,” said Mark C. McDonald, president and CEO of the Trust. “This year’s winners represent a tremendous dedication to restoring and revitalizing Georgia’s historic buildings and communities. We are proud to honor such deserving projects and individuals.”

The historic City Hall in Griffin, Ga. received the Marguerite Williams Award, presented annually to the project that has had the greatest impact on preservation in the state. The building also received an award for Excellence in Rehabilitation.

The historic City Hall in Griffin—a former Georgia Trust Places in Peril site— was recognized for the town’s determination to rehabilitate the historic building, passing a SPLOST bill to fund the work. This project exemplifies an outstanding rehabilitation project that shows the determination of Griffin’s leadership and citizens who have proven that “where there’s a will, there’s a way.”

The Corker Building in Dublin, Ga. received the Chairman’s Award, presented by the chairman of The Georgia Trust to a person or project of great preservation significance. The building also received an award for Excellence in Rehabilitation.

The Eagle Saloon Suites in Bainbridge, Ga. received the inaugural Michael L. Starr Award, presented to a project that best exemplifies the highest standards of historic rehabilitation and has a significant impact on the downtown of the city in which it is located. 

The Trust presented three awards for Excellence in Restoration, fourteen awards for Excellence in Rehabilitation, one award for Excellence in Preservation, one award for Excellence in Preservation Service and two awards for Excellence in Stewardship.

The Trust presented the Mary Gregory Jewett Award for Lifetime Preservation Service to Anne Shelander Floyd of the CSRA Regional Commission in Augusta. The Camille W. Yow Volunteer of the Year Award was given to Halston Pitman of Atlanta. 

The Excellence in Restoration winners were the Battle of Atlanta Cyclorama at the Atlanta History Center, Atlanta; Fairview School, Cave Spring; and the Owens-Thomas House, Savannah.

Excellence in Rehabilitation winners were: Blue Springs Plantation, Albany; Women's Comfort Station at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta; Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center, Augusta; 941 Ellis Street, Augusta; Augusta YMCA/TaxSlayer, Augusta; Decatur Presbyterian Church, Decatur; Historic Mule Barn and Dundee Café on the University of Georgia Griffin campus; R. J. Taylor Memorial Hospital, Hawkinsville; McCaw-Massee House, Macon; Jenkins Hall at Georgia Military College, Milledgeville; Armstrong-Kessler Mansion, Savannah; and the Berrien House, Savannah.

The Randolph-Lucas-Jones House in Atlanta received an Excellence in Preservation Award.

The University of Georgia in Athens was recognized with an award for Excellence in Preservation Service for their Historic Preservation Master Plan.

Excellence in Stewardship winners were the Georgia State Society Daughters of the American Revolution for its longtime dedication and maintenance of Meadow Garden in Augusta and Dr. Mary Williams for her long-term care and preservation of the Weaver-Dallas House in Thomaston.

In addition, the Georgia Trust awarded Connor McKell Bingham, a senior intern and associate at Historical Concepts Architecture and Planning in Atlanta, with the J. Neel Reid Prize to support travel in America, France and Italy.

For more than 40 years, the Trust has recognized preservation projects and individuals throughout Georgia who have made significant contributions to the field of historic preservation. Awards are presented on the basis of the contributions of the person or project to the community and/or state and on compliance with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties.

Founded in 1973, the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is one of the country’s leading statewide, nonprofit preservation organizations. The Trust works for the preservation and revitalization of Georgia’s diverse historic resources and advocates their appreciation, protection and use. 

The Georgia Trust generates community revitalization by finding buyers for endangered properties acquired by its Revolving Fund and raises awareness of other endangered historic resources through an annual listing of Georgia’s “Places in Peril.” The Trust honors preservation projects and individuals with its annual Preservation Awards and recognizes students and professionals with the Neel Reid Prize and Liz Lyon Fellowship. The Trust offers a variety of educational programs, provides technical assistance to property owners and historic communities, advocates for funding, tax incentives and other laws aiding preservation efforts, and manages two house museums in Atlanta (Rhodes Hall) and Macon (Hay House). 

To learn more about The Georgia Trust and the Preservation Awards, visit www.georgiatrust.org.


































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