Large Cache Of Weapons Found At Home Of Signal Mountain Man Who Planned Militia Raid Against Muslim Community

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

An FBI agent testified on Tuesday that a large cache of weapons was found in the home of a Signal Mountain man who planned to lead a small militia unit against groups he considered enemies of the U.S.

The agent said there were two large assault-type weapons in the living room, and agents also found several thousand rounds of ammunition throughout the house that is just across the county line in Sequatchie County.

The assault guns, including a Sig Sauer M400 and a Mossberg rifle, were displayed to the jury along with some of the ammunition. The agent said the ammunition "was in suitcases, duffel bags, plastic bags in the closet - all over the place." It included tracer ammunition for illuminating targets at night. 

Robert Doggart wound up targeting Muslims in the town of Islamburg, N.Y., prosecutor Perry Piper told the jury in the case being heard by Judge Curtis Collier.

An FBI agent said Doggart's phone was tapped and a confidential source was used by the government to infiltrate the group.

The jury heard a number of calls between the source and Doggart as well as being shown Facebook posts between Doggart and members of his militia on private accounts.

Doggart said the militia members would use powerful weapons, including those "battle size that don't miss."

He said it would carry out "carefully considered attacks and make a statement in behalf of American patriotism."

Doggart said he wanted to see "high casualty rates." He said, "They will not be capable of dealing with our level of violence."

Doggart, who at one point referred to himself as Dr. Doggart and another as Rev. Doggart, said the target "must be utterly destroyed to get the attention of other Americans" who might join his effort.

He said he wanted to line up 20 "expert gunners who can do a lot of damage."

Doggart was in contact with about five individuals, including several in Texas and one in Oregon who expressed interest in his mission. The agent said these individuals were questioned by the FBI and some of their residences were searched.

According to the testimony, Doggart was planning a trip to Hancock, N.Y., near Islamburg and hoped to enlist its mayor and City Council in his cause.

The confidential source did fly to Nashville on March 17, 2015, where he was picked up by Doggart at the airport. They had lunch at Ruby Tuesday's where they discussed the planned attack. The source was wired and an FBI agent was having lunch in a nearby booth. Agents had tagged along behind Doggart all the way from his home to the airport and then to the restaurant. A tracker was on his car. 

Doggart said that the objective was "to set things right so this world can live in peace."

He said the gunmen will "be cruel to them" and the raid would result in "bullet-riddled bodies."

Doggart said the targets to take out included a mosque, a school and a cafeteria.

He said the raid "could be the flash point where we finally say no more. It will be the shot heard round the world the second time."

Over lunch at the restaurant, Doggart said, "We will be warriors and they will fear us. We will be cruel."

Doggart said officials at Hancock should be cooperative because he said the nearby Muslims were a threat to poison the town's water supply. He said it could be done "with one 500-gallon drum."

With agents listening in nearby, Doggart mused, "I can see this whole thing falling apart. Loose lips sink ships. One person starts talking to another person and pretty soon the FBI is on to it."

He said he had called the home of one of the men in Texas who was supposed to take part. He said his wife answered and asked what he wanted, then hung up. 

The agent, under cross-examination from attorney Garth Best, acknowledged that the confidential source used in the case worked for the government for some 20 years and was paid over $250,000, including expenses.

He said the agent, during the time the Doggart case was open, had one heart attack, then died from a second attack. He said some word had gotten out that he might be working for the government within other patriotic militant groups and threats had been made against his family. He said his widow was given a $10,000 lump sum after his death for his work on the Doggart case.

He said the source came to Chattanooga at one point and met with Doggart at the City Cafe downtown.

 


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